BTG’s….

Posted on - In Birds2blog
....top of the pop's for me again on the Lune Estuary.It was good to find the godwits in good number on the Lune Estuary at Glasson again yesterday, but on my first visit as the tide raced in counting was difficult, they were seen in four groups, one at the Conder mouth was particularly hard to get to grips with, they were a distance, packed tight and deep. But on a return three hours after the high tide, life was made easier as the birds were feeding and more strung out, it was an interesting exercise, and the estimate was of at least 1,750 Black-tailed Godwit. Also of note, 3 Knot, 2 Red-breasted Merganser drakes, and 3 Eider were my first here since five on 27 June 2016.I only had a brief look in on Conder Pool yesterday to find 17 Tufted Duck, a pair of Shoveler, and a single Snipe, a Kestrel was hovering close ...
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The Non-Starter.

Posted on - In Birds2blog
We had a 'numbers' first on Friday when 3 Siskin visited our garden, all males on the same feeder, excellent....But little did I know that these three were going to be birds of the day as I set off from home on my birding trip around the Lune Estuary, which turned out to be something of a non-starter.But I must have foreseen the lack of quantity if not quality I was going to have today when I arrived at Conder Pool, which has once again become more a lake than a pool, with little to attract the waders, so to make sure I had something in the book I decided to note every bird I saw, all 55 of 'em....12 Wigeon, 10 Oystercatcher, 10 Black-headed Gull, 9 Tufted Duck, 8 Mute Swan, 3 Shelduck, 2 Mallard, and a Goosander. In the creeks, the Common Sandpiper and a single Little Grebe.On the Lune Estuary, a Spotted Redshank&n...
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A Hint Of Spring

Posted on - In Birding Aldcliffe
StonechatWith cool, overcast conditions it didn't seem much like spring down at Aldcliffe this morning. But the sound of multiple singing birds certainly hinted that change was in the air.Oystercatchers were noisily pairing up and proclaiming potential territories while a few lapwings were already staking their claims in the maize fields.Small numbers of meadow pipit were passing over and a handful of 'new-in' reed buntings were evident around the patch. A small group of linnet were feeding on the tideline.Other new arrivals included a female stonechat at Marsh Point and a green sandpiper at the Wildfowlers'  Pools.Around 1,200 pink-footed geese on Aldcliffe Marsh, plus several fieldfare and redwings along the path hedgerows, were reminders that winter is still very much clinging on...The regular greenshank continues to hang around on ...
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First The Fish

Posted on - In Another Bird Blog
Thursday morning – a fish day. So I called at Jamie’s shop at Knott End for supplies of brain food - haddock and salmon then spent a while birding around the shore and the jetty. Knott End and Fleetwood Oystercatcher numbers are in decline as many move north and inland to breed, but still 220+ on the incoming tide with a single Curlew and a few Redshank for company. Nine Turnstone fed below the jetty with 32 Shelduck and 15/20 Black-headed Gull on the shore. The wintering Black Redstart was in the usual spot, darting around the area of the residential flats where it seems to find plenty of food and not too much competition from aggressive Robins. Black RedstartTurnstone At Fluke Hall the local Tree Sparrows are getting a little noisy and very active around the nest boxes in the trees. I clocked the Grey Wagtail that has winte...
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Yesterday

Posted on - In Fleetwood Birder
It was a tad cool on the coast yesterday as there was some northerly in the westerly, and with full cloud cover no sun to warm things up! It was also murky out at sea and as a result the sea passage was even slower than the day before, and the vis was nearly non-existent!The sea produced six Common Scoters, eleven Eiders, a Red-throated Diver, seven Shelducks, a Great Crested Grebe, three Red-breasted Mergansers and two Cormorants.Grounded migrants were restricted to three males and a female Stonechat, but it won't be long until the first Sand Martins, Wheatears and Chiffchaffs appear! Roosting waders included twenty Sanderlings, eleven Oystercatchers, eight Ringed Plovers and three Turnstones (all the Turnstones were at the Marine Lakes). Stonechatsanderlings The near non-existent vis was just a single Alba Wagtail, a Meadow Pipit and...
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Day Of The Godwit.

Posted on - In Birds2blog
Black-tailed Godwit. Lune Estuary 29 April 2016. Pete Woodruff.On the Lune Estuary at Glasson Dock on Tuesday, an arrival in style when my count came to at least 2,250 Black-tailed Godwit, a spectacular sight with some of the males standing out in their well advanced bright orange-rufous breeding plumage even at the distance. This count exceeds mine or any other previous counts at this location, including WeBS counts for the Lune Estuary.Also mingling with the BTG's I could pick out a few Knot and Dunlin, with 6 Goldeneye, a drake Red-breasted Merganser and a pair of Goosander were also of note....The Spotted Redshank and Common Sandpiper with 3 Little Grebe were all on show in the creeks at Conder Green, and 3 Goosander were on Conder Pool.At Cockersand, the swan herd was tighter grouped than it has ...
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It’s All In The Flex!

Posted on - In Fleetwood Birder
It was a beautiful spring-like day yesterday when I headed to the Point for a sea watch. I had 3 oktas hazy cloud cover with a 5 mph westerly wind. High tide was about an hour before I got there and the tide was just starting to turn.Spring seawatching is one of my favourite disciplines within the broader umbrella of birding, and I particularly like the spring Red-throated Diver passage when birds are travelling in to the bay at height to cross over land to the North Sea! There was some diver passage this morning with five 'Red-throats' in and two out, but none of the birds moving in to the bay were high. Some of the divers were close in and I always enjoy watching them 'motor' along with that long neck of theirs flexing up and down; superb!The supporting cast on the sea included twelve Eiders, 28 Common Scoters, a Shelduck, a Great Crested...

Blog Post: Hen Harrier Hotline relaunched

Posted on - In Sky Dancer
  As spring has now almost sprung, we’ve relaunched our Hen Harrier Hotline with the hope of finding out where these seriously threatened birds of prey might be breeding in England’s moorland.   If you are out hiking or cycling in the hills, please keep an eye out for one. If you are lucky enough to see a hen harrier, please get in touch.    The Harrier Hotline number is 0845 4600121 (calls charged at local rate) .  Reports can also be e-mailed to henharriers@rspb.org.uk.  Reports of sightings should include the date and location of sighting, with a six-figure grid reference where possible. A description of the bird’s behaviour would also be useful.   Many of you will be able to spot a hen harrier half a mile away in poor weather conditions. But for those of you who are less familiar with the bird of prey, here is a reminder o...

Rant And Ring

Posted on - In Another Bird Blog
There’s still no ringing allowed near home. DEFRA are taking no chances on the possibility that Avian Flu might still spread, but there’s no information about when the saga might end. Avian Flu Zones What a shame that DEFRA’s inspectors weren’t on the ball in the first place when they would have seen that in this part of Lancashire gamebird rearing operations are environmental disasters waiting to happen. It gets worse. Each autumn in the UK many millions of cage reared pheasant, partridge and duck are released into the wild for the purposes of then shooting them. Pre or post, there is little or no qualified assessment as to the impact of the releases upon wild bird populations or the environment.So called “game shooting” is big business in providing jobs and revenue for those involved whereby there is zero likelihood...
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